It is not easy to test the strengths and weaknesses of autonomous driving. So much so that the houses are doing experiments in areas closed to traffic, in order to recreate a scenario as close as possible to reality. The British group Jaguar-Land Rover has done more: they have designed a real city. Better: a smart city. That is, a totally connected place, as (they say) will be the city of a not so distant future.

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Ireland. Near Limerick. This is where the laboratory-city used to test and develop self-driving, connected, electric and shared vehicles will arise. The facility, called The Future Mobility Campus Ireland, will go into operation in September 2021 and will be the result of the British group’s collaboration with various software companies, such as Cisco, Seagate, Renovo and Red Hat.

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The Future Mobility Campus Ireland will allow unmanned versions of the Jaguar I-Pace to travel along approximately 12 km of roads alongside other cars, pedestrians and cyclists. The site will be fully served by sensors and will have accurate localization systems and a management and control center. The complex will include intelligent intersections, connected carriageways, automated parking and charging points for electric vehicles. In addition to links to a 450km networked motorway section and a drone air traffic corridor controlled by Shannon Airport. “It will be possible to simulate a variety of road environments and traffic scenarios, which will allow us to collect valuable data and allow future systems to be developed more efficiently,” explained John Cormican, General Manager of Shannon Ireland Jaguar Land Rover.

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The project is part of a broad program development of autonomous driving that Jaguar Land Rover has started for some time by entering into agreements with some tech giants and academic bodies. In 2018, the manufacturer announced a long-term partnership with Waymo, Google’s autonomous car division that is also working to bring Waymo Driver level 4 autonomous driving aboard future models from Volvo, Lynk and Polestar. Also in the future, JLR recently unveiled the Project Vector battery-powered vehicle platform, developed at Warwick University’s National Automotive Innovation Center in the UK, capable of supporting configurations to form the basis of various automated vehicles.

November 17, 2020 (change November 17, 2020 | 12:49)

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