Ramy Youssef and Mahershala Ali in season 2 of Ramy.
Ramy Youssef and Mahershala Ali in season 2 of Ramy. (CRAIG BLANKENHORN)

Cap inside out, hooded sweatshirt, Ramy, is a 28-year-old American of Egyptian origin of the Muslim faith who grew up in Bruce Springsteen’s New Jersey. A young Tanguy who still lives with his parents, struggling with their enormous pressure to enter the world, the reality of society and his own desires.

Ramy Youssef, Golden Globes 2020 for Best Actor

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That was the highlight of this different and honest series written by standuper Rami Youssef, this year’s Golden Globe for Best Actor in a Comedy Series, already accustomed to telling on stage his struggles to reconcile a good Muslim and modern life. So we are already very happy to see him again this week in a second season available on the Starzplay platform and to see him continue his quest. The season begins after the moving and missed homecoming in Egypt, to meet his grandfather and his origins. After a gap with his cousin, Ramy is still looking for himself and is more than ever addicted to pornographic films.

Addicted to porn

This time, to find the right path, he unearths an old church converted into a more convivial Sufi mosque. A place led by a calm, conciliatory and wise sheik who becomes his mentor. With immediate effects: Ramy now offers his family to recite the prayer at the start of a meal, which has the gift of annoying his father. The sheikh advises him to take care of a dog to learn honesty.

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If the first season allowed us to discover the different members of his family, the uninhibited sister, the demanding parents, the anti-Semitic uncle on the edges … The second season is less “buddy movie”, more in the portrait of the main character . He meets the attractive daughter of the Sheik, a star porn actress, a young veteran of the Iraq war who converts to the Muslim religion. As for the sheikh, he is embodied by the excellent and soothing two-time Oscar winner Mahershala Ali.

This second season is reminiscent of a Muslim Gaston Lagaffe: we fear at every moment the awkwardness that will prevent any success. A series with political contours in filigree, sincere and funny

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